Last edited by Maushicage
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

7 edition of Ar"n"t I a woman? found in the catalog.

Ar"n"t I a woman?

female slaves in the plantation South

by Deborah G. White

  • 347 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Norton in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Southern States.,
  • Southern States
    • Subjects:
    • Women slaves -- Southern States.,
    • Plantation life -- Southern States -- History.,
    • Slaves -- Southern States -- Social conditions.

    • Edition Notes

      Other titlesAren"t I a woman?
      StatementDeborah Gray White.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsE443 .W58 1985
      The Physical Object
      Pagination216 p. ;
      Number of Pages216
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3024520M
      ISBN 10039302217X
      LC Control Number85004842

      Buy Arn't I a Woman? by Deborah Gray White online at Alibris. We have new and used copies available, in 1 editions - starting at $ Shop now. Get this from a library! Ar'n't I a woman?: female slaves in the plantation South. [Deborah G White] -- "This new edition of Ar'n't I a Woman? reviews and updates the scholarship on slave women and the slave family, exploring new ways of understanding the intersection of race and gender and comparing.

        have used the book in the classr oom, this essay also discus ses some of the reasons it remains the pr emier book adopted in history and African Ameri - can, women, and gender studies courses at institutions of higher learning. Ar ÕnÕt I a W oman? is an instr uctive tool that I .   White's book explores the state of the female slave in the American south. Again, slave women disproved the reasons-weakness, vulnerability, aptitude- to marginalize women as there was no chance for survival possessing any of those characteristics. This short work is broken down into six chapters that include topics like the female slave.

        "One of those rare books that quickly became the standard work in its field." —Anne Firor Scott, Duke University. Living with the dual burdens of racism and sexism, slave women in the plantation South assumed roles within the family and community that contrasted sharply with traditional female roles in the larger American : $ This book demonstrates that white males and their heterosexist patriarchy are mostly to blame for the maltreatment of Women of Color in the south. As a white woman, I am just so impressed and filled with gratitude at this tremendous work of insightful scholarship.


Share this book
You might also like
The 2000 Import and Export Market for Equipment for Distributing Electricity in Oceana (World Trade Report)

The 2000 Import and Export Market for Equipment for Distributing Electricity in Oceana (World Trade Report)

Survey of the mentally ill in Greenwich

Survey of the mentally ill in Greenwich

New-York Society for the Information and Assistance of Persons Emigrating from Foreign Countries.

New-York Society for the Information and Assistance of Persons Emigrating from Foreign Countries.

Walls and ceilings

Walls and ceilings

Veterans health care

Veterans health care

sacred bee in ancient times and folklore

sacred bee in ancient times and folklore

Evidence rules annotated.

Evidence rules annotated.

Selected references on AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome)

Selected references on AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome)

Materials for a history of the province of New Brunswick

Materials for a history of the province of New Brunswick

Fundamentals of the design theory.

Fundamentals of the design theory.

TV lighting handbook

TV lighting handbook

Bible treasury

Bible treasury

Ar"n"t I a woman? by Deborah G. White Download PDF EPUB FB2

"One of those rare books that quickly became the standard work in its field." ―Anne Firor Scott, Duke University. Living with the dual burdens of racism and sexism, slave women in the plantation South assumed roles within the family and community that contrasted sharply with traditional female roles in the larger American by: My book group is reading Ta-Nehisi Arnt I a woman?

book books and wanted to balance his voice with that of a black woman. I’ve been reading several books trying to find some for us to consider. As a ‘70s era, second wave (white) feminist, I’m one of those people who was oblivious to the racism in the feminist movement/5.

"One of those rare books that quickly became the standard work in its field." —Anne Firor Scott, Duke University, Ar'n't I a Woman?, Female Slaves in the Plantation.

Importance and Impact. In the original edition of her book Ar’n’t I a Woman?:Female Slaves in the Plantation South (Norton, ), Deborah Gray White stated that its aim was “to enrich our knowledge of antebellum black culture and to serve as a chapter in the yet unwritten history of the American black woman” (25).

Thanks much in part to this effort by White, an effort that in was. This book is a classic. It should be read by anyone who takes feminism seriously. – Sojourner [Ain’t I a Woman]should be widely read, thoughtfully considered, discussed, and finally acclaimed for the real enlightenment it offers for social change.

– Library Journal. One of the twenty most influential women’s books of the last twenty. Any studentor researcher studying slave women and their roles in the antebellum south will find this book tobe an asset in their research thanks to the rich descriptions, comprehensive survey of thechallenges specifically facing woman and the differences between their fellow male slaves.

Women aren't fragile things that need to be treated like weird glass-blown angels Sojourner Truth proves this by being strong. but she also proves that Black women are treated absolutely horrifically. She gets worked like a man (and beaten like a man) and so is considered less of a woman.

Buy Ar'n't I a Woman?: Female Slaves in the Plantation South Revised by White, Deborah Gray (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible s:   At the Women’s Rights Convention held in Akron, Ohio, Sojourner Truth delivered what is now recognized as one of the most famous abolitionist and women’s rights speeches in American history, “Ain’t I a Woman?” She continued to speak out for the rights of African Americans and women during and after the Civil War.

WELCOME, LET THE FUN BEGIN. Get e-Books "Arnt I A Woman" on Pdf, ePub, Tuebl, Mobi and Audiobook for are more than 1 Million Books that have been enjoyed by people from all over the world. Always update books hourly, if not looking, search in the book.

In the book Ar'n't I a Woman?, by Deborah Gray White, the reader is challenged by the author to set previous notions regarding American slave women aside to understand the truth, which has long been elusive to the majority of Americans. Over the course of the work, White shocks and appalls.

The speech begins with Sojourner Truth politely asking permission to say a few words. She opens with the conclusion, “I am a woman’s rights,” and begins laying out her evidence. She asserts that she is as strong as any man and is capable of doing the work of a man such as.

The title of this book comes from the inspiring words spoken by Sojourner Truth at thenine years prior to the Civil War at a Women’s Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio. In Deborah Grays White, Ar’n’t I a woman her aim was to enrich the knowledge of antebellum black women and culture to.

This book is an indepth study about how female slaves in South America resiliently fighted for their motherhood, femininity, love, and freedom despite so many tragedies, biases, myths, and crimes implemented upon them by slave owners; so that in the end female slaves "could answer a confident "yes" to the persistent question: "Ar'n't I a Woman?"/5.

Female Slaves in the Plantation SouthThere are many books in print on the subject of slavery in the US and a handful On the history of black women in America. But no other author has focused his or her attention exclusively on the Place where these two subjects intersect.

White has in this slim (under pages), scholarly, yet highly readable. Living with the dual burdens of racism and sexism, slave women in the plantation South assumed roles within the family and community that contrasted sharply with traditional female roles in the larger American revised edition of Ar'n't I a Woman.

reviews and updates the scholarship on slave women and the slave family, exploring new ways of understanding the intersection of race /5(5). Free of charge Books, whether Arnt I a Woman PDF eBooks or in other format, are accessible within a heap around the web.

Lastly, the following techniques for finding cost-free ebooks are all legal. We know as well as the following geek that anyone and their brother can fire up a BitTorrent client and download complete ebook libraries or simply.

African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist, Sojourner Truth was born into slavery as Isabella Baumfree in Swartekill, Ulster County, New York. During the Civil War, Truth helped recruit black troops for the Union Army and tried unsuccessfully, after.

As white women were placed atop pedestals and sheltered by their men, African American women were hardly seen as women at all, and therefore, treated as physically brutal as African American men.

Only black women had their womanhood completely stripped of them. For me, this comparison was one of the most enlightening portions of the book. Deborah Gray White’s book, Ar’n’t I a Woman. Female Slaves in the Plantation South, emphasizes the importance of the need for writing about the history of slave women.

White lists many examples of theories of slavery that do not include women specifically or generalizes both genders. Due to the lack of source material on slave women in. Black Women and Feminism () argues for black women to embrace feminism as an ideology, and fight for their full inclusion in all levels of the feminist movement.

The author, bell hooks (lowercase intentional), explains that during slavery, due to being both black and a woman, black female slaves experienced the brunt of misogyny. Sojourner Truth (c. ) was arguably the most famous of the 19th Century black women orators. Born into slavery in New York and freed in under the state’s gradual emancipation law, she dedicated her life to abolition and equal rights for women and men.Title: Arnt I A Woman Format: Paperback Product dimensions: pages, X X in Shipping dimensions: pages, X X in Published: Febru Publisher: WW Norton Language: English.